Doodle Drawings

You don't Want a Masterpiece,
You want Great Effects!


Doodle Drawings

Doodle Drawings—that's when your pencil or pen wanders all over the paper in a completely random fashion—as your mind is on other more important things, like chatting to your boyfriend, how to ask your dad for more cash or if it is the right time to ask your boss for a raise?

Your doodle drawings may well be like Jackson Pollock's abstracts, some of your lines or scribbles may take on the shape and likeness of a face or a flower.

If it faintly resembles a face you'll want to emphasize one or two features—as your dad asks you why you want extra cash for the weekend; "Why isn't it enough?" says he and you continue doodling.

At this point your pressure on the pen creates more robust lines (as you are now less relaxed) which actually gives the "doodle" an interesting effect. Then your boss walks into the office and you cover up your sketch as it looks vaguely like him with a bulbous nose (gosh, he mustn't see that!) He departs quickly from the office as you resume your doodling.

Psychiatrists would analyze your doodle drawings as they have lots of experience in analyzing ink blobs (or completely random shapes) which tells them "the interplanetary alignment is not good at this time." So that tells you what? Absolutely nothing!

If you look closely at your doodles where lines cross and shapes criss-cross, you'll notice many images can be created...and it is really cool, like these;

  • Mother-in-law's face
  • A map of a small town in Idaho
  • A rubbish dump
  • Aunt Sarah's new hair do
  • A Jackson Pollock look-alike
  • A satellite view of Katrina
  • Your grandsons' scribbling on the lounge wall
  • Picasso's drawings
  • A Star Wars nightmare
  • A NYC graffiti wall
  • South Park rip off

Do real artists doodle? You bet they do—and they love it. It is fun to do and you never know the results—it may even hang in the NY Museum of Modern Art (MoMa) next to Jackson Pollack.

Some Tips on Doodling

  • Don't ever take it seriously, it should be a happy meandering of your thoughts and pencil
  • Try drawing opposite combinations. Example; An ugly face entwined with an angel or Count Dracula with a beautiful girl
  • Doodle on one of those cheap writing pads so you will not feel put off with white paper. Some of them have lines while others have small grids—go for the grids—you'll be able to doodle geometric abstracts
  • Get a variety of doodling pens, thick and thin, fat and short
  • Don't doodle all in black, use a variety of colors but draw the lighter ones in first; that's because light colors do not mark opaquely when used over dark—but it is okay the other way around

I've often heard that doodling relaxes the mind and therefore relieves stress; I tend to agree with that statement. You can purchase books on the meanings of doodle drawings—would that be like trying to read the future in tea cups? I wonder.

These are not really "Doodles" but quick sketches from varying sources. Maybe it can be a starting point for your doodling sessions with a pencil?




 

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